Connecticut Sex Offenders

The state Legislature made the Connecticut Sex Offender Law in 1998. The law mandates the state department of safety to register every convicted sex offender in the state. This information is available at local police stations within Connecticut and over the internet.

Connecticut Sex Offender Law mandates all sex offenders in the state to register their name and home address.

The law grants an exemption to offenders convicted as Juveniles. Offenders tried and jailed as adults must register unless a court of law prevents it.

The state legislature modified the law in 2009. The changes include notifying the community whenever a sex offender is out of jail.

The details of such sex offender should go to schools in the neighborhood where the offender lives or plan to reside.

The law makes sure the public are aware of sex offenders among them. It also prevents violent predators from re-offending.

Connecticut Sex Offender Registry

The Connecticut sex offender Registry provides information on Sex Offenders in the state. The information is available to the general public on the internet. The Registry is an online tool designed to help create awareness on the dangers of sex offenders.

Connecticut Sex Offender law ensures that the information on the registry is up-to-date and accurate.

You can search the registry by city, neighborhoods, and streets. A list of sex offenders and their recent photographs are available for every community in Connecticut.

Connecticut Sex Offender Facts

Facts

  • There are 5,770 registered sex offenders in Connecticut

Top Offenses

  • 53-21(a)(2) - Risk or Injury to a minor involving contact with the intimate parts of someone under age 16
  • 53a-70 - Sexual assault 1st
  • 53a-71(a)(1) - Sexual assault 2nd of a minor
  • 53a-72a - Sexual assault 3rd
  • 53a-70(a)(2) - First Degree Sexual Assault involving sexual intercourse with someone under age 13

Counties in Connecticut with the highest number of offenders:

  • Hartford County
  • New Haven County
  • Fairfield County
  • New London County
  • Windham County
Zip Codes in Connecticut with the highest number of offenders:
  • 06511
  • 06106
  • 06051
  • 06105
  • 06513
  • 06704
  • 06320
  • 06360
  • 06114
  • 06108
Nearby States:
Connecticut Sex Crimes Requiring Offender Registration

Criminal Offense against a Victim Who is a Minor:

  • Having contact with the intimate parts of a minor under 16 or subjecting a minor under 16 to contact with the intimate parts of such person sexually and indecently likely to impair the health or morals of such child - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53-21(a) (2) (West 2008).

  • Sexual assault (1st degree) of a person under 13 years of age when the offender is at least two years older than the victim - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-70(a)(2) (West 2008).

  • Sexual assault (2nd degree) when the victim is: (1) between the ages of 13 and 16, and the offender is at least 2 years older than the victim; (2) less than 18 years old and the actor is the victim's guardian or is otherwise responsible for the general supervision of the victim's welfare; or (3) the actor is a school employee and the victim is a student enrolled in a school in which the actor works or a school under the jurisdiction of the local or regional board that employs the actor - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-71(a)(1), (4) or (8) (West 2008).

  • Sexual assault (3rd degree) when the actor engages in sexual intercourse with another person whom the actor knows to be related to him or her within specified degrees of kindred - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a72a (a)(2) (West 2008).

  • Promoting prostitution (1st degree) when the offender advances or profits from the prostitution of a person less than 16 years old - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-86(a)(2) (West 2008).

  • Promoting prostitution (2nd degree) when the offender advances or profits from the prostitution of a person less than 18 years old - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-87(a)(2) (West 2008).

  • Enticing a minor - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-90a (West 2008).

  • Employing a minor in an obscene performance - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-196a (West 2008).

  • Promoting a minor in an obscene performance - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-196b (West 2008).

  • Importing child pornography - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-196c (West 2008).

  • Possessing child pornography (1st degree) - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-196d (West 2008).

  • Possessing child pornography (2nd degree) - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-196e (West 2008).

  • Possessing child pornography (3rd degree) - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-196f (West 2008).

  • Kidnapping (1st degree) of a victim under the age of 18 - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-92 (West 2008).

  • Kidnapping (1st degree with a firearm) of a victim under the age of 18 - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-92a (West 2008).

  • Kidnapping (2nd degree) of a victim under the age of 18 - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-94 (West 2008).

  • Kidnapping (2nd degree with a firearm) of a victim under the age of 18 - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-94a (West 2008).

  • Unlawful restraint (1st degree) of a victim under the age of 18 - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-95 (West 2008).

  • Unlawful restraint (2nd degree) of a victim under the age of 18 - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-96 (West 2008).

  • Public indecency involving a victim under the age of 18 - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-186 (West 2008).

  • Committing an offense listed above for which a person can be criminally liable for the acts of another or the attempt or conspiracy to commit one of the crimes listed above.

Sexually Violent Offenses:

  • Sexual assault (1st degree), except when the victim is under the age of 13, and the offender is at least two years older than the victim - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-70 (West 2008) (except (a)(2)).

  • Sexual assault in a spousal or cohabiting relationship - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-70b (West 2008).

  • Sexual assault (2nd degree) - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-71 (West 2008) (except (a)(1), (4) or (8)).

  • Sexual assault (3rd degree) - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-72a (West 2008) (except (a)(2)).

  • CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-72b (West 2008).

  • Kidnapping (1st degree), provided the court makes a finding that the offense was committed with the intent to sexually violate or abuse the victim - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-92 (West 2008).

  • Kidnapping (1st degree with a firearm), provided the courts makes a finding that the offense was committed with the intent to sexually violate or abuse the victim - CONN. GEN. STAT. § 53a-92a (West 2008).

  • Committing an offense listed above for which a person can be criminally liable for the acts of another or the attempt or conspiracy to commit one of the crimes listed above.

Information maintained in Connecticut Sex Offender Registry

C.G.S.A. § 54-251(a), 54-252(a), 54-253(b), & 54-254(a)

  • name

  • fingerprints

  • photograph

  • description of any other identifying characteristics

  • a blood sample or another biological sample for DNA analysis

  • criminal history record

  • address of residence

  • status as a student or employee at an institution of higher learning, trade institution or professional institution

  • documentation of any treatment received for mental abnormality or personality disorder (for persons convicted of a sexually violent offense)

Community Notification and Websites

C.G.S.A. § 54-258

(a)(1):

  • The registry maintained by the Department of Public Safety shall be a public record and shall be accessible to the public during regular business hours.

  • The Department of Public Safety shall make registry information available to the public through the Internet.

  • Not less than once per calendar quarter, the Department of Public Safety shall issue notices to all print and electronic media in the state regarding the availability and means of accessing the registry.

  • Each local police department and each state police troop shall keep a record of all registration information transmitted to it by the Department of Public Safety, and shall make such information accessible to the public during normal business hours.

(a)(2): Any state agency, the Judicial Department, any state police troop or any local police department may, at its discretion, notify any government agency, private organization or individual of registration information when such agency, said department, such troop or such local police department, as the case may be, believes such notification is necessary to protect the public or any individual in any jurisdiction from any person who is subject to registration

Limitations on Residency or Employment

None

Duration of Registration

C.G.S.A. § 54-252(a)

Life for persons convicted of sexually violent offenses.

C.G.S.A. § 54-251(a)

10 years for persons convicted of a criminal offense against a minor or a nonviolent sexual offense, unless the offender has a prior conviction for any such offense, in which case registration is for life.

C.G.S.A. § 54-254(a)

10 years for persons convicted of a felony which the court finds was committed for a sexual purpose.

Duration of Registration

ALA. CODE § 15-20-33 (West 2008)

  1. Adult criminal sex offenders are subject to registration and notification for life.

Timeframe for Registration

At the time of release from custody or at sentencing if placed on probation; 30 days of entering the state, 10 days of changing the address

Applies to Offenders Convicted in another State?

Yes

Verification of Address

Yes

Penalties for Non-Compliance

Misdemeanor mandatory, min. 90 days imprisonment w/balance of at least one-year probation, up to 1-year imprisonment; second and subsequent failures Class G felony; parole/probation revocation

What does a Sex Offender Look Like?

Most people think sexual predators are scary-looking and creepy. But three out of four adolescents who were sexually assaulted were victimized by someone they knew well.

Most of the time, sexual predators look like regular people. Children and parents need to know and to understand that anyone can be a sexual predator, no matter how "normal" they appear.

Encouraging Children to Share

It isn't always easy to build a trusting relationship with your child. Trying to get your children to share what is going on in their lives can be difficult.

Building an open and welcoming environment from the beginning stages of a child's life is essential. Children are less intimidated and more likely to discuss issues and topics in their lives with an open and supportive environment.

Getting your kids to share serves as a building block for times when your child needs to discuss pressing issues like sex and sexual abuse.

Free Parental eBook

KidsLiveSafe put together a comprehensive parents guide about sexual predators and keeping children safe. This free online eBook includes vital statistics, how to tell if a predator is victimizing a child, and social media and cyber-bullying.

See KidsLiveSafe eBook