Vermont Sex Offenders

Vermont’s sex offender law took effect on July 1, 1996. The law protects residents of Vermont by ensuring that persons convicted of a sex offense register in the state. The law applies to sex offenders convicted in the state on or after July 1, 1996.

According to the law, a sex offender who stays in Vermont for 10 straight days now lives in the state. The offender will have to register in the state if convicted in another state on or after July 1, 1995.

Sex offenders with the intent of living, attending school, or working in Vermont must register in the state.

Sex offenders in Vermont must report any change to the registered information within 24 hours.

A sex offender registered in Vermont but who wishes to move to another state must inform the VCIC about his/her plans. Such an offender must submit their new address to the Vermont Crime Information Center (VCIC). He/she must also register with the Sex Offender Register of the new state within 3 days of relocation.

Vermont Sex Offender Registry

Vermont’s Sex Offender Registry is in charge of all information about registered sex offenders in the state. The registry updates and stores this information in their database. Residents of Vermont can access this information from the registry’s official website.

Vermont Sex Offender Facts

Facts

  • There are 1,340 registered sex offenders in Vermont

Top Offenses

  • 13V2602 - LEWD-LASCIVIOUS CONDUCT WITH CHILD
  • 13V3252A3 - SEXUAL ASSAULT-VICTIM16 YRS
  • 13V2601 - LEWD-LASCIVIOUS CONDUCT
  • 13V2827 - POSSESSION OF CHILD PORNOGRAPHY
  • 13V3252C - SEXUAL ASSAULT-VICTIM16 YRS

Counties in Vermont with the highest number of offenders:

  • Chittenden County
  • Rutland County
  • Franklin County
  • Bennington County
  • Washington County
Zip Codes in Vermont with the highest number of offenders:
  • 05401
  • 05201
  • 05701
  • 05641
  • 05301
  • 05478
  • 05819
  • 05156
  • 05452
  • 05488
Nearby States:
Vermont Sex Crimes Requiring Offender Registration
  • Sexual assault - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 3252 (West 2008).

  • Aggravated sexual assault - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 3253 (West 2008).

  • Lewd and lascivious behavior - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 2601 (West 2008).

  • Sexual abuse of a vulnerable adult - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 1379 (West 2008).

  • Voyeurism (2nd or subsequent convictions) - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 2638(b) (West 2008).

  • The attempt to commit any of the above-listed offenses.

A person who is convicted of any of the following offenses against a victim who is a minor, except that, for purposes of this subdivision, conduct which is criminal only because of the age of the victim shall not be considered an offense for purposes of the registry if the perpetrator is under the age of 18:

  • Sexual assault - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 3252 (West 2008).

  • Aggravated sexual assault - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 3253 (West 2008).

  • Lewd and lascivious behavior - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 2601 (West 2008).

  • Sexual abuse of a vulnerable adult - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 1379 (West 2008).

  • Voyeurism (2nd or subsequent convictions) - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 2638(b) (West 2008).

  • Kidnapping - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 2405 (West 2008).

  • Lewd and lascivious behavior with a child - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 2602 (West 2008)

  • White slave traffic - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, § 2635 (West 2008).

  • Sexual exploitation of children - VT. STAT. ANN. tit. 13, §§ 2821-2828 (West 2008).

  • Procurement or solicitation - VT. STAT. ANN. tit.13, § 2632 (West 2008).

  • The attempt to commit any of the above-listed offenses.

  • A person who takes up residence in Vermont, other than within a correctional facility, and who has been convicted in any jurisdiction of the United States for a sex crime, the elements of which would constitute an offense listed in (1) or (2) above if committed in Vermont.

  • A nonresident sex offender who crosses into Vermont and who is employed carries on a vocation or is a Student.

Information maintained in Vermont Sex Offender Registry

13 V.S.A. § 5403 (West 2008)

(a) Upon conviction and before sentencing, the court shall order the sex offender to provide the court with the following information, which the court shall forward to the department forthwith:­

  1. name;

  2. date of birth;

  3. general physical description;

  4. current address;

  5. Social Security number;

  6. fingerprints;

  7. current photograph;

  8. current employment; and

  9. name and address of any postsecondary educational institution at which the sex offender is enrolled as a student.

Community Notification and Websites

13 V.S.A. § § 5411 (West 2008)

(b)(1) The department, the department of corrections, and any authorized local law enforcement agency shall release registry information concerning persons required to register under state law if the requestor can articulate a concern about the behavior of a specific person regarding the requestor's safety or the safety of another, or the requestor has reason to believe that a specific person may be a registered sex offender and can articulate a concern regarding the requestor's safety or the safety of another.

(c) (1) Except as provided for in subsection (e) of this section, upon request of a member of the public about a specific person, the department, the department of corrections, and any authorized local law enforcement agency shall release registry information on sex offenders whose information is required to be posted on the internet.

13 V.S.A. § 5411a (West 2008)

The department shall electronically post information on the internet regarding the following sex offenders, upon their release from confinement:

(8) Sex offenders who have been convicted of an aggravated sexual assault, lewd or lascivious conduct with the child if the offender has been designated as high risk by the department of corrections or kidnapping and sexual assault of a child

(9) Sex offenders who have at least one prior conviction for an offense described in subdivision 5401(10) of this subchapter.

(10) Sex offenders who have failed to comply with sex offender registration requirements and for whose arrest there is an outstanding warrant for such noncompliance. Information on offenders shall remain on the internet only while the warrant is outstanding.

(11) Sex offenders who have been designated as sexual predators.

(12) Sex offenders who have not complied with sex offender treatment recommended by the department of corrections or who are ineligible for sex offender treatment.

(13) Sex offenders who have been designated by the department of corrections as high-risk.

Limitations on Residency or Employment

None

Duration of Registration

13 V.S.A. § 5407(e)-(f) (West 2008)

10 years for persons not subject to lifetime registration.

Life for persons:

  • With at least 1 prior conviction or a registrable offense

  • Convicted of sexual assault when the victim was under 14 and the offender was more than 6 years older than the victim

  • Convicted of aggravated sexual assault

  • Determined to be a sexually violent predator.

    Timeframe for Registration

    Within 10 days after establishing residence in the state, annually within 10 days after each anniversary of the person’s date of release, 3 days of changing the address

    Applies to Offenders Convicted in another State?

    Yes

    Verification of Address

    Yes, the department shall update the record at least every 3 months

    Penalties for Non-Compliance

    For a first offense, up to 2 years imprisonment and $1,000 fine. For second and subsequent offense, by a sexually violent predator, up to 3 years imprisonment and $5,000 fine

What does a Sex Offender Look Like?

Most people think sexual predators are scary-looking and creepy. But three out of four adolescents who were sexually assaulted were victimized by someone they knew well.

Most of the time, sexual predators look like regular people. Children and parents need to know and to understand that anyone can be a sexual predator, no matter how "normal" they appear.

Encouraging Children to Share

It isn't always easy to build a trusting relationship with your child. Trying to get your children to share what is going on in their lives can be difficult.

Building an open and welcoming environment from the beginning stages of a child's life is essential. Children are less intimidated and more likely to discuss issues and topics in their lives with an open and supportive environment.

Getting your kids to share serves as a building block for times when your child needs to discuss pressing issues like sex and sexual abuse.

Free Parental eBook

KidsLiveSafe put together a comprehensive parents guide about sexual predators and keeping children safe. This free online eBook includes vital statistics, how to tell if a predator is victimizing a child, and social media and cyber-bullying.

See KidsLiveSafe eBook